lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2021]   [Dec]   [13]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
SubjectRe: [PATCH V6 2/7] soc: qcom: dcc:Add driver support for Data Capture and Compare unit(DCC)
From
On 8/10/21 12:54 PM, Souradeep Chowdhury wrote:
> The DCC is a DMA Engine designed to capture and store data
> during system crash or software triggers.The DCC operates
> based on user inputs via the sysfs interface.The user gives
> addresses as inputs and these addresses are stored in the
> form of linkedlists.In case of a system crash or a manual
> software trigger by the user through the sysfs interface,
> the dcc captures and stores the values at these addresses.
> This patch contains the driver which has all the methods
> pertaining to the sysfs interface, auxiliary functions to
> support all the four fundamental operations of dcc namely
> read, write, first read then write and loop.The probe method
> here instantiates all the resources necessary for dcc to
> operate mainly the dedicated dcc sram where it stores the
> values.The DCC driver can be used for debugging purposes
> without going for a reboot since it can perform manual
> triggers.

I don't understand what you're trying to say with the last
sentence above.

> Also added the documentation for sysfs entries
> and explained the functionalities of each sysfs file that
> has been created for dcc.

Could these files all land in debugfs, at least initially?
I guess if you get it right it's fine in sysfs, but unlike
sysfs, debugfs is not considered a stable user space API.

> The following is the justification of using sysfs interface
> over the other alternatives like ioctls
>
> i) As can be seen from the sysfs attribute descriptions,
> most of it does basic hardware manipulations like dcc_enable,
> dcc_disable, config reset etc. As a result sysfs is preferred
> over ioctl as we just need to enter a 0 or 1.
>
> ii) Existing similar debug hardwares are there for which drivers
> have been written using sysfs interface.One such example is the
> coresight-etm-trace driver.A closer analog can also be the watchdog
> subsystems though it is ioctls based.

Even if it eventually becomes a sysfs interface, it might
be better to initially land it in debugfs. (Maybe others
disagree.)

Generally, it looks to me like this always reads memory in
32-bit units. I might have missed it, but if that is not
documented it should be. Also, is it OK to provide an
address that is not aligned on a 32-bit boundary? I
presume memory is interpreted as CPU endian; does that
produce the most meaningful results if the offset isn't
aligned?

More comments, below.

-Alex

> Signed-off-by: Souradeep Chowdhury <schowdhu@codeaurora.org>
> ---
> Documentation/ABI/testing/sysfs-driver-dcc | 114 ++
> drivers/soc/qcom/Kconfig | 8 +
> drivers/soc/qcom/Makefile | 1 +
> drivers/soc/qcom/dcc.c | 1549 ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
> 4 files changed, 1672 insertions(+)
> create mode 100644 Documentation/ABI/testing/sysfs-driver-dcc
> create mode 100644 drivers/soc/qcom/dcc.c
>
> diff --git a/Documentation/ABI/testing/sysfs-driver-dcc b/Documentation/ABI/testing/sysfs-driver-dcc
> new file mode 100644
> index 0000000..05d24f0
> --- /dev/null
> +++ b/Documentation/ABI/testing/sysfs-driver-dcc

Throughout this file, add a space or two after each period.

> @@ -0,0 +1,114 @@
> +What: /sys/bus/platform/devices/.../trigger
> +Date: March 2021

Probably update these dates when the code is close to
getting accepted.

> +Contact: Souradeep Chowdhury <schowdhu@codeaurora.org>
> +Description:
> + This is the sysfs interface for manual software

Try to reword each of the descriptions so they don't
talk about "this sysfs interface." Each one of these
*is* describing a sysfs interface file, so that can be
omitted from the description. For example:

This file is used to perform a manual trigger
operation, causing all lists of memory operations
to be executed.

Or something along those lines.

> + triggers.The user can simply enter a 1 against
> + the sysfs file and enable a manual trigger.
> + Example:
> + echo 1 > /sys/bus/platform/devices/.../trigger
> +
> +What: /sys/bus/platform/devices/.../enable
> +Date: March 2021
> +Contact: Souradeep Chowdhury <schowdhu@codeaurora.org>
> +Description:
> + This sysfs interface is used for enabling the
> + the dcc hardware.Without this being set to 1,
> + the dcc hardware ceases to function.

This could/should use a standard Boolean interface. That is,
parse the input in your code using kstrtobool() on the buffer
passed to your store function.


> + Example:
> + echo 0 > /sys/bus/platform/devices/.../enable
> + (disable interface)
> + echo 1 > /sys/bus/platform/devices/.../enable
> + (enable interface)
> +
> +What: /sys/bus/platform/devices/.../config
> +Date: March 2021
> +Contact: Souradeep Chowdhury <schowdhu@codeaurora.org>
> +Description:
> + This is the most commonly used sysfs interface
> + file and this basically stores the addresses of

It doesn't matter if this is the "most commonly used" file.
Just describe what it does.

If I understand it right, you write a memory offset and
an (optional) number of consecutive memory addresses to
be read.

> + the registers which needs to be read in case of
> + a hardware crash or manual software triggers.
> + Example:
> + echo 0x80000010 10 > /sys/bus/platform/devices/../config
> + This specifies that 10 words starting from address
> + 0x80000010 is to be read.In case there are no words to be
> + specified we can simply enter the address.

I don't know what "in case there are no words to be specified"
means. Does that just mean memory at exactly one offset is
read is implied if a count is not specified?

> +
> +What: /sys/bus/platform/devices/.../config_write
> +Date: March 2021
> +Contact: Souradeep Chowdhury <schowdhu@codeaurora.org>
> +Description:
> + This file allows user to write a value to the register
> + address given as argument.The values are entered in the
> + form of <register_address> <value>.The reason for this
> + feature of dcc is that for accessing certain registers
> + it is necessary to set some bits of soe other register.
> + That is achievable by giving DCC this privelege.
> + Example:
> + echo 0x80000000 0xFF > /sys/bus/platform/devices/.../config_write
> +
> +What: /sys/bus/platform/devices/.../config_reset
> +Date: March 2021
> +Contact: Souradeep Chowdhury <schowdhu@codeaurora.org>
> +Description:
> + This file is used to reset the configuration of
> + a dcc driver to the default configuration.

What does it mean to "reset the driver to the default"?
Does that mean all lists of operations supplied previously
are forgotten, and the lists become empty and disabled?

> + Example:
> + echo 1 > /sys/bus/platform/devices/.../config_reset
> +
> +What: /sys/bus/platform/devices/.../loop
> +Date: March 2021
> +Contact: Souradeep Chowdhury <schowdhu@codeaurora.org>
> +Description:

Can looping be done for a write or read/modify/write operation,
or is it only used for reads?

Now skipping ahead to the code.

> + This file is used to enter the loop count as dcc
> + driver gives the option to loop multiple times on
> + the same register and store the values for each

. . .

> diff --git a/drivers/soc/qcom/dcc.c b/drivers/soc/qcom/dcc.c
> new file mode 100644
> index 0000000..daf4388
> --- /dev/null
> +++ b/drivers/soc/qcom/dcc.c
> @@ -0,0 +1,1549 @@
> +// SPDX-License-Identifier: GPL-2.0-only
> +/*
> + * Copyright (c) 2015-2021, The Linux Foundation. All rights reserved.
> + */
> +
> +#include <linux/bitfield.h>
> +#include <linux/bitops.h>
> +#include <linux/cdev.h>
> +#include <linux/delay.h>
> +#include <linux/fs.h>
> +#include <linux/io.h>
> +#include <linux/iopoll.h>
> +#include <linux/module.h>
> +#include <linux/of.h>
> +#include <linux/of_device.h>
> +#include <linux/platform_device.h>
> +#include <linux/slab.h>
> +#include <linux/uaccess.h>
> +
> +#define TIMEOUT_US 5000

This timeout is only used when polling the STATUS register to
determine when the DCC hardware is "ready". Maybe the name
could reflect that (STATUS_READY_TIMEOUT?).

I think the next two might be better implemented as functions.
It would allow the compiler to do some additional type checking.

> +#define dcc_writel(drvdata, val, off) \
> + writel((val), drvdata->base + dcc_offset_conv(drvdata, off))
> +#define dcc_readl(drvdata, off) \
> + readl(drvdata->base + dcc_offset_conv(drvdata, off))
> +
> +#define DCC_SRAM_NODE "dcc_sram"
> +
> +/* DCC registers */
> +#define DCC_HW_INFO 0x04
> +#define DCC_LL_NUM_INFO 0x10
> +#define DCC_STATUS 0x1C
> +#define DCC_LL_LOCK(m) (0x34 + 0x80 * m)
> +#define DCC_LL_CFG(m) (0x38 + 0x80 * m)
> +#define DCC_LL_BASE(m) (0x3c + 0x80 * m)
> +#define DCC_FD_BASE(m) (0x40 + 0x80 * m)
> +#define DCC_LL_TIMEOUT(m) (0x44 + 0x80 * m)
> +#define DCC_LL_INT_ENABLE(m) (0x4C + 0x80 * m)
> +#define DCC_LL_INT_STATUS(m) (0x50 + 0x80 * m)
> +#define DCC_LL_SW_TRIGGER(m) (0x60 + 0x80 * m)
> +#define DCC_LL_BUS_ACCESS_STATUS(m) (0x64 + 0x80 * m)

The MAP_LEVEL and MAP_OFFSET definitions below, together
with the function dcc_offset_conv(), are a clever way to
have the above set of offsets "work" by mapping them to
(at least) three distinct "actual" addresses. That is:

if (map_ver == 1)

if (0 <= offset < MAP_LEVEL_1)

actual_offset = offset

else if (MAP_LEVEL_1 <= offset < MAP_LEVEL_2)

actual_offset = offset - MAP_OFFSET_1

else if (MAP_LEVEL_2 <= offset < MAP_LEVEL_3)

actual_offset = offset - MAP_OFFSET_2

else

actual_offset = offset - MAP_OFFSET_3

else
if (map_ver == 2)
if (0 <= offset < MAP_LEVEL_1)

actual_offset = offset

else

actual_offset = offset - MAP_OFFSET_4

else
actual_offset = offset

This is a bit messy, but other ways of doing it aren't
likely to be any cleaner. Regardless, this whole mapping
process should be explained in comments.

> +#define DCC_MAP_LEVEL1 0x18
> +#define DCC_MAP_LEVEL2 0x34
> +#define DCC_MAP_LEVEL3 0x4C
> +
> +#define DCC_MAP_OFFSET1 0x10
> +#define DCC_MAP_OFFSET2 0x18
> +#define DCC_MAP_OFFSET3 0x1C
> +#define DCC_MAP_OFFSET4 0x8
> +
> +#define DCC_FIX_LOOP_OFFSET 16
> +#define DCC_VER_INFO_BIT 9
> +
> +#define DCC_READ 0
> +#define DCC_WRITE 1
> +#define DCC_LOOP 2
> +#define DCC_READ_WRITE 3
> +
> +#define MAX_DCC_OFFSET GENMASK(9, 2)
> +#define MAX_DCC_LEN GENMASK(6, 0)
> +#define MAX_LOOP_CNT GENMASK(7, 0)
> +
> +#define DCC_ADDR_DESCRIPTOR 0x00
> +#define DCC_ADDR_LIMIT 27
> +#define DCC_ADDR_OFF_RANGE 8
> +#define DCC_ADDR_RANGE GENMASK(31, 4)
> +#define DCC_LOOP_DESCRIPTOR BIT(30)
> +#define DCC_RD_MOD_WR_DESCRIPTOR BIT(31)
> +#define DCC_LINK_DESCRIPTOR GENMASK(31, 30)
> +
> +#define DCC_READ_IND 0x00
> +#define DCC_WRITE_IND (BIT(28))
> +
> +#define DCC_AHB_IND 0x00
> +#define DCC_APB_IND BIT(29)
> +
> +#define DCC_MAX_LINK_LIST 8
> +#define DCC_INVALID_LINK_LIST GENMASK(7, 0)
> +
> +#define DCC_VER_MASK1 GENMASK(6, 0)
> +#define DCC_VER_MASK2 GENMASK(5, 0)
> +
> +#define DCC_RD_MOD_WR_ADDR 0xC105E
> +
> +struct qcom_dcc_config {

No need for "qcom_" in the type name here.

> + int dcc_ram_offset;
> +};
> +
> +enum dcc_descriptor_type {
> + DCC_ADDR_TYPE,
> + DCC_LOOP_TYPE,
> + DCC_READ_WRITE_TYPE,
> + DCC_WRITE_TYPE
> +};
> +
> +enum dcc_mem_map_ver {
> + DCC_MEM_MAP_VER1 = 1,
> + DCC_MEM_MAP_VER2 = 2,
> + DCC_MEM_MAP_VER3 = 3

This enumerated type doesn't really add any value. Just use 1, 2, and 3
for your version numbers in the few places this is used in code. If it
gets more complicated than this one-to-one mapping in the future, add
a type like this.

> +};
> +
> +struct dcc_config_entry {

. . .

> +static bool dcc_ready(struct dcc_drvdata *drvdata)
> +{
> + u32 val;
> +
> + return !readl_poll_timeout((drvdata->base + dcc_offset_conv(drvdata, DCC_STATUS)),

Use dcc_readl(drvdata, offset) here.

> + val, (FIELD_GET(GENMASK(1, 0), val) == 0), 1, TIMEOUT_US);

Use !FIELD_GET(...) here.

Is the 1 microsecond delay required?

> +
> +}
> +
> +static int dcc_read_status(struct dcc_drvdata *drvdata)
> +{
> + int curr_list;
> + u32 bus_status;
> + u32 ll_cfg;
> + u32 tmp_ll_cfg;
> +
> + for (curr_list = 0; curr_list < drvdata->nr_link_list; curr_list++) {
> + if (!drvdata->enable[curr_list])
> + continue;
> +
> + bus_status = dcc_readl(drvdata, DCC_LL_BUS_ACCESS_STATUS(curr_list));
> +
> + if (bus_status) {
> + dev_err(drvdata->dev,
> + "Read access error for list %d err: 0x%x.\n",
> + curr_list, bus_status);
> +
> + ll_cfg = dcc_readl(drvdata, DCC_LL_CFG(curr_list));
> + tmp_ll_cfg = ll_cfg & ~BIT(9);
> + dcc_writel(drvdata, tmp_ll_cfg, DCC_LL_CFG(curr_list));
> + dcc_writel(drvdata, 0x3,
> + DCC_LL_BUS_ACCESS_STATUS(curr_list));

What does writing 1 to the bottom two bits of the STATUS
register do? Can you represent that with a mask, which
defines the register field?

> + dcc_writel(drvdata, ll_cfg, DCC_LL_CFG(curr_list));
> + return -ENODATA;
> + }
> + }
> +
> + return 0;
> +}
> +
> +static int dcc_sw_trigger(struct dcc_drvdata *drvdata)
> +{
> + int ret;
> + int curr_list;
> + u32 ll_cfg;
> + u32 tmp_ll_cfg;
> +
> + mutex_lock(&drvdata->mutex);
> +
> + for (curr_list = 0; curr_list < drvdata->nr_link_list; curr_list++) {
> + if (!drvdata->enable[curr_list])
> + continue;
> + ll_cfg = dcc_readl(drvdata, DCC_LL_CFG(curr_list));
> + tmp_ll_cfg = ll_cfg & ~BIT(9);

What does bit 9 of this register represent? Why is it turned
off here?

> + dcc_writel(drvdata, tmp_ll_cfg, DCC_LL_CFG(curr_list));
> + dcc_writel(drvdata, 1, DCC_LL_SW_TRIGGER(curr_list));
> + dcc_writel(drvdata, ll_cfg, DCC_LL_CFG(curr_list));

Does this assume that bit 9 of the register was originally set?

> + }
> +
> + if (!dcc_ready(drvdata)) {
> + dev_err(drvdata->dev,
> + "DCC is busy after receiving sw tigger.\n");
> + ret = -EBUSY;
> + goto err;
> + }
> +
> + ret = dcc_read_status(drvdata);
> +
> +err:
> + mutex_unlock(&drvdata->mutex);
> + return ret;
> +}
> +

. . .

> +static int __dcc_ll_cfg(struct dcc_drvdata *drvdata, int curr_list)
> +{
> + int ret = 0;
> + u32 total_len, pos;
> + struct dcc_config_entry *entry;
> + struct dcc_cfg_attr cfg;
> + struct dcc_cfg_loop_attr cfg_loop;
> +
> + memset(&cfg, 0, sizeof(cfg));
> + memset(&cfg_loop, 0, sizeof(cfg_loop));
> + cfg.sram_offset = drvdata->ram_cfg * 4;
> + total_len = 0;
> +
> + list_for_each_entry(entry, &drvdata->cfg_head[curr_list], list) {
> + switch (entry->desc_type) {
> + case DCC_READ_WRITE_TYPE:
> + ret = _dcc_ll_cfg_read_write(drvdata, entry, &cfg);
> + if (ret)
> + goto overstep;
> + break;
> +
> + case DCC_LOOP_TYPE:
> + ret = _dcc_ll_cfg_loop(drvdata, entry, &cfg, &cfg_loop, &total_len);
> + if (ret)
> + goto overstep;
> + break;
> +
> + case DCC_WRITE_TYPE:
> + ret = _dcc_ll_cfg_write(drvdata, entry, &cfg, &total_len);
> + if (ret)
> + goto overstep;
> + break;
> +
> + default:

Use this instead of "default":
case DCC_ADDR_TYPE:

> + ret = _dcc_ll_cfg_default(drvdata, entry, &cfg, &pos, &total_len);
> + if (ret)
> + goto overstep;
> + break;
> + }
> + }
> +
> + if (cfg.link) {
> + ret = dcc_sram_writel(drvdata, cfg.link, cfg.sram_offset);
> + if (ret)
> + goto overstep;
> + cfg.sram_offset += 4;
> + }

. . .

> +static ssize_t enable_show(struct device *dev,
> + struct device_attribute *attr, char *buf)
> +{
> + int ret;
> + bool dcc_enable = false;
> + struct dcc_drvdata *drvdata = dev_get_drvdata(dev);
> +
> + mutex_lock(&drvdata->mutex);
> + if (drvdata->curr_list >= drvdata->nr_link_list) {
> + dev_err(dev, "Select link list to program using curr_list\n");

Can this actually happen? Isn't curr_list initially 0?
And can't you constrain the store function for curr_list
so it never exceeds nr_link_list?

> + ret = -EINVAL;
> + goto err;
> + }
> +
> + dcc_enable = is_dcc_enabled(drvdata);
> +
> + ret = scnprintf(buf, PAGE_SIZE, "%u\n",
> + (unsigned int)dcc_enable > +err:
> + mutex_unlock(&drvdata->mutex);
> + return ret;
> +}
> +
> +static ssize_t enable_store(struct device *dev,
> + struct device_attribute *attr,
> + const char *buf, size_t size)
> +{
> + int ret = 0;
> + unsigned long val;
> + struct dcc_drvdata *drvdata = dev_get_drvdata(dev);
> +
> + if (kstrtoul(buf, 16, &val))
> + return -EINVAL;

I recommend using kstrtobool() here.

> +
> + if (val)
> + ret = dcc_enable(drvdata);
> + else
> + dcc_disable(drvdata);
> +
> + if (!ret)
> + ret = size;
> +
> + return ret;
> +
> +}

. . .

> +static ssize_t config_write_store(struct device *dev,
> + struct device_attribute *attr,
> + const char *buf, size_t size)
> +{
> + int ret;
> + int nval;
> + unsigned int addr, write_val;
> + int apb_bus = 0;
> + struct dcc_drvdata *drvdata = dev_get_drvdata(dev);
> +
> + mutex_lock(&drvdata->mutex);
> +
> + nval = sscanf(buf, "%x %x %d", &addr, &write_val, &apb_bus);

You didn't document in the sysfs documentation the optional
third argument here, which specify APB rather than AHB bus.

> + if (nval <= 1 || nval > 3) {
> + ret = -EINVAL;
> + goto err;
> + }
> +
> + if (drvdata->curr_list >= drvdata->nr_link_list) {
> + dev_err(dev, "Select link list to program using curr_list\n");

Here again (and everywhere else), avoid this possible error
condition by guaranteeing it will never be assigned a value
that's larger than nr_link_list.

> + ret = -EINVAL;
> + goto err;
> + }
> +
> + if (nval == 3 && apb_bus != 0)
> + apb_bus = 1;
> +
> + ret = dcc_add_write(drvdata, addr, write_val, apb_bus);
> + if (ret)
> + goto err;
> +
> + mutex_unlock(&drvdata->mutex);
> + return size;
> +err:
> + mutex_unlock(&drvdata->mutex);
> + return ret;
> +}
> +
> +static DEVICE_ATTR_WO(config_write);
> +
> +static const struct device_attribute *dcc_attrs[] = {
> + &dev_attr_trigger,
> + &dev_attr_enable,
> + &dev_attr_config,
> + &dev_attr_config_reset,
> + &dev_attr_ready,
> + &dev_attr_interrupt_disable,
> + &dev_attr_loop,
> + &dev_attr_rd_mod_wr,
> + &dev_attr_curr_list,
> + &dev_attr_config_write,
> + NULL,
> +};
> +
> +static int dcc_create_files(struct device *dev,
> + const struct device_attribute **attrs)
> +{
> + int ret = 0, i;

Cant these be initialized automatically as an attribute group
or something? Maybe I'm getting confused.

> + for (i = 0; attrs[i] != NULL; i++) {
> + ret = device_create_file(dev, attrs[i]);
> + if (ret) {
> + dev_err(dev, "DCC: Couldn't create sysfs attribute: %s\n",
> + attrs[i]->attr.name);
> + break;
> + }
> + }
> + return ret;
> +}
> +
> +static int dcc_sram_open(struct inode *inode, struct file *file)
> +{
> + struct dcc_drvdata *drvdata = container_of(inode->i_cdev,
> + struct dcc_drvdata,
> + sram_dev);
> + file->private_data = drvdata;
> +
> + return 0;
> +}
> +
> +static ssize_t dcc_sram_read(struct file *file, char __user *data,
> + size_t len, loff_t *ppos)
> +{
> + unsigned char *buf;
> + struct dcc_drvdata *drvdata = file->private_data;
> +
> + /* EOF check */
> + if (drvdata->ram_size <= *ppos)
> + return 0;
> +
> + if ((*ppos + len) > drvdata->ram_size)
> + len = (drvdata->ram_size - *ppos);
> +
> + buf = kzalloc(len, GFP_KERNEL);
> + if (!buf)
> + return -ENOMEM;
> +
> + memcpy_fromio(buf, drvdata->ram_base + *ppos, len);
> +
> + if (copy_to_user(data, buf, len)) {
> + dev_err(drvdata->dev, "DCC: Couldn't copy all data to user\n");

Don't allow user input (i.e., providing a bad buffer pointer
in this case) lead to spamming the log. The EFAULT error is
enough to explain what the problem is. In generaly, I don't
think you should call dev_err() in these sysfs functions.

> + kfree(buf);
> + return -EFAULT;
> + }
> +
> + *ppos += len;
> +
> + kfree(buf);
> +
> + return len;
> +}
> +
> +static const struct file_operations dcc_sram_fops = {
> + .owner = THIS_MODULE,
> + .open = dcc_sram_open,
> + .read = dcc_sram_read,
> + .llseek = no_llseek,
> +};


Since dcc_sram_dev_init() does nothing but call this function,
why not just incorporate one into the other? Same thing goes
for dcc_sram_dev_exit() and dcc_sram_dev_deregister().

> +static int dcc_sram_dev_register(struct dcc_drvdata *drvdata)
> +{
> + int ret;
> + struct device *device;
> + dev_t dev;
> +
> + ret = alloc_chrdev_region(&dev, 0, 1, DCC_SRAM_NODE);
> + if (ret)
> + goto err_alloc;
> +
> + cdev_init(&drvdata->sram_dev, &dcc_sram_fops);
> +
> + drvdata->sram_dev.owner = THIS_MODULE;
> + ret = cdev_add(&drvdata->sram_dev, dev, 1);
> + if (ret)
> + goto err_cdev_add;
> +
> + drvdata->sram_class = class_create(THIS_MODULE, DCC_SRAM_NODE);
> + if (IS_ERR(drvdata->sram_class)) {
> + ret = PTR_ERR(drvdata->sram_class);
> + goto err_class_create;
> + }
> +
> + device = device_create(drvdata->sram_class, NULL,
> + drvdata->sram_dev.dev, drvdata,
> + DCC_SRAM_NODE);
> + if (IS_ERR(device)) {
> + ret = PTR_ERR(device);
> + goto err_dev_create;
> + }
> +
> + return 0;
> +err_dev_create:
> + class_destroy(drvdata->sram_class);
> +err_class_create:
> + cdev_del(&drvdata->sram_dev);
> +err_cdev_add:
> + unregister_chrdev_region(drvdata->sram_dev.dev, 1);
> +err_alloc:
> + return ret;
> +}
> +
> +static void dcc_sram_dev_deregister(struct dcc_drvdata *drvdata)
> +{
> + device_destroy(drvdata->sram_class, drvdata->sram_dev.dev);
> + class_destroy(drvdata->sram_class);
> + cdev_del(&drvdata->sram_dev);
> + unregister_chrdev_region(drvdata->sram_dev.dev, 1);
> +}
> +
> +static int dcc_sram_dev_init(struct dcc_drvdata *drvdata)
> +{
> + int ret = 0;
> +
> + ret = dcc_sram_dev_register(drvdata);
> + if (ret)
> + dev_err(drvdata->dev, "DCC: sram node not registered.\n");
> +
> + return ret;
> +}
> +
> +static void dcc_sram_dev_exit(struct dcc_drvdata *drvdata)
> +{
> + dcc_sram_dev_deregister(drvdata);
> +}
> +
> +static int dcc_probe(struct platform_device *pdev)
> +{
> + u32 val;
> + int ret = 0, i, enable_size, nr_config_size, cfg_head_size;
> + struct device *dev = &pdev->dev;
> + struct dcc_drvdata *dcc;
> + struct resource *res;
> + const struct qcom_dcc_config *cfg;
> +
> + dcc = devm_kzalloc(dev, sizeof(*dcc), GFP_KERNEL);
> + if (!dcc)
> + return -ENOMEM;
> +
> + dcc->dev = &pdev->dev;
> + platform_set_drvdata(pdev, dcc);
> +
> + dcc->base = devm_platform_ioremap_resource(pdev, 0);

I mentioned earlier, it might be nice to give these memory
ranges a name more meaningful than 0 and 1.

> + if (IS_ERR(dcc->base))
> + return PTR_ERR(dcc->base);
> +
> + dcc->ram_base = devm_platform_get_and_ioremap_resource(pdev, 1, &res);
> + if (IS_ERR(dcc->ram_base))
> + return PTR_ERR(dcc->ram_base);
> +
> + dcc->ram_size = resource_size(res);

Did you already take care of remapping with the call just above?

> + dcc->ram_base = devm_ioremap(dev, res->start, resource_size(res));
> + if (!dcc->ram_base)
> + return -ENOMEM;

In any case, I think this second memory region is more like
memory space than I/O space. If so, memremapping it might
be the right thing to do.

> + cfg = of_device_get_match_data(&pdev->dev);
> + dcc->ram_offset = cfg->dcc_ram_offset;
> +
> + val = dcc_readl(dcc, DCC_HW_INFO);

Can you provide a short block of code that explains in English
what the next set of if statements are doing, and why?

> + if (FIELD_GET(BIT(DCC_VER_INFO_BIT), val)) {
> + dcc->mem_map_ver = DCC_MEM_MAP_VER3;
> + dcc->nr_link_list = dcc_readl(dcc, DCC_LL_NUM_INFO);
> + if (dcc->nr_link_list == 0)
> + return -EINVAL;
> + } else if ((val & DCC_VER_MASK2) == DCC_VER_MASK2) {
> + dcc->mem_map_ver = DCC_MEM_MAP_VER2;
> + dcc->nr_link_list = dcc_readl(dcc, DCC_LL_NUM_INFO);
> + if (dcc->nr_link_list == 0)
> + return -EINVAL;
> + } else {
> + dcc->mem_map_ver = DCC_MEM_MAP_VER1;
> + dcc->nr_link_list = DCC_MAX_LINK_LIST;
> + }

What does bit 6 in the HW_INFO register represent?

> + if ((val & BIT(6)) == BIT(6))

if (val & BIT(6))

> + dcc->loopoff = DCC_FIX_LOOP_OFFSET;
> + else
> + dcc->loopoff = get_bitmask_order((dcc->ram_size +
> + dcc->ram_offset) / 4 - 1);
> +
> + mutex_init(&dcc->mutex);
> + /* Allocate space for all entries at once */
> + enable_size = dcc->nr_link_list * sizeof(bool);
> + nr_config_size = dcc->nr_link_list * sizeof(size_t);
> + cfg_head_size = dcc->nr_link_list * sizeof(struct list_head);
> +
> + dcc->enable = devm_kzalloc(dev, enable_size + nr_config_size + cfg_head_size, GFP_KERNEL);
> + if (!dcc->enable)
> + return -ENOMEM;
> +
> + dcc->nr_config = (size_t *)(dcc->enable + dcc->nr_link_list);
> + dcc->cfg_head = (struct list_head *)(dcc->nr_config + dcc->nr_link_list);
> +
> + for (i = 0; i < dcc->nr_link_list; i++)
> + INIT_LIST_HEAD(&dcc->cfg_head[i]);
> +
> + dcc->curr_list = DCC_INVALID_LINK_LIST;
> + ret = dcc_sram_dev_init(dcc);
> + if (ret)
> + return ret;
> +
> + return dcc_create_files(dev, dcc_attrs);

If dcc_create_files() returns an error, you are not calling
dcc_sram_dev_exit() to clean things up.

> +}
> +
> +static int dcc_remove(struct platform_device *pdev)
> +{
> + struct dcc_drvdata *drvdata = platform_get_drvdata(pdev);
> +
> + dcc_sram_dev_exit(drvdata);
> +
> + dcc_config_reset(drvdata);
> +
> + return 0;
> +}
> +
> +static const struct qcom_dcc_config sm8150_cfg = {
> + .dcc_ram_offset = 0x5000,

If you know you'll be adding more fields there's nothing
wrong with this, but if the only thing you're storing is
the RAM offset, there's no need to define that within a
structure. Just do something like:

{ .compatible = "qcom,sm8150-dcc", .data = (void *)0x5000 },

> +};
> +
> +static const struct qcom_dcc_config sc7280_cfg = {
> + .dcc_ram_offset = 0x12000,
> +};
> +
> +static const struct qcom_dcc_config sc7180_cfg = {
> + .dcc_ram_offset = 0x6000,
> +};
> +
> +static const struct qcom_dcc_config sdm845_cfg = {
> + .dcc_ram_offset = 0x6000,
> +};
> +
> +static const struct of_device_id dcc_match_table[] = {
> + { .compatible = "qcom,sm8150-dcc", .data = &sm8150_cfg },
> + { .compatible = "qcom,sc7280-dcc", .data = &sc7280_cfg },
> + { .compatible = "qcom,sc7180-dcc", .data = &sc7180_cfg },
> + { .compatible = "qcom,sdm845-dcc", .data = &sdm845_cfg },
> + { }
> +};
> +MODULE_DEVICE_TABLE(of, dcc_match_table);
> +
> +static struct platform_driver dcc_driver = {
> + .probe = dcc_probe,
> + .remove = dcc_remove,
> + .driver = {
> + .name = "qcom-dcc",
> + .of_match_table = dcc_match_table,
> + },
> +};
> +
> +module_platform_driver(dcc_driver);
> +
> +MODULE_LICENSE("GPL v2");
> +MODULE_DESCRIPTION("Qualcomm Technologies Inc. DCC driver");
> +
>

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2021-12-13 23:36    [W:0.094 / U:0.424 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site