lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2023]   [Mar]   [6]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
From
Date
SubjectRe: [PATCH V7 0/3] Generate device tree node for pci devices
On Mon, Mar 6, 2023 at 3:24 PM Frank Rowand <frowand.list@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> On 3/6/23 02:35, clement.leger@bootlin.com wrote:
> > Le 2023-03-04 00:42, Frank Rowand a écrit :
> >> On 2/27/23 04:31, Clément Léger wrote:
> >>> Le Mon, 27 Feb 2023 00:51:29 -0600,
> >>> Frank Rowand <frowand.list@gmail.com> a écrit :
> >>>
> >>>> On 1/19/23 21:02, Lizhi Hou wrote:
> >>>>> This patch series introduces OF overlay support for PCI devices
> >>>>> which
> >>>>> primarily addresses two use cases. First, it provides a data driven
> >>>>> method
> >>>>> to describe hardware peripherals that are present in a PCI endpoint
> >>>>> and
> >>>>> hence can be accessed by the PCI host. Second, it allows reuse of a
> >>>>> OF
> >>>>> compatible driver -- often used in SoC platforms -- in a PCI host
> >>>>> based
> >>>>> system.
> >>>>>
> >>>>> There are 2 series devices rely on this patch:
> >>>>>
> >>>>> 1) Xilinx Alveo Accelerator cards (FPGA based device)
> >>>>> 2) Microchip LAN9662 Ethernet Controller
> >>>>>
> >>>>> Please see:
> >>>>> https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/20220427094502.456111-1-clement.leger@bootlin.com/
> >>>>>
> >>>>
> >>>>
> >>>>> Normally, the PCI core discovers PCI devices and their BARs using
> >>>>> the
> >>>>> PCI enumeration process. However, the process does not provide a way
> >>>>> to
> >>>>> discover the hardware peripherals that are present in a PCI device,
> >>>>> and
> >>>>> which can be accessed through the PCI BARs. Also, the enumeration
> >>>>> process
> >>>>
> >>>> I'm confused. The PCI Configuration Header Registers should describe
> >>>> the
> >>>> hardware on the PCI card.
> >>>>
> >>>> Ignoring case 1 above _for the moment_ (FPGA devices are a world unto
> >>>> themselves, so I would like to analyze that case separately), does
> >>>> the
> >>>> second device, "Microchip LAN9662 Ethernet Controller" properly
> >>>> implement
> >>>> the PCI Configuration Header Registers? What additional information
> >>>> is
> >>>> needed that is not provided in those registers?
> >>>
> >>> Hi Frank,
> >>>
> >>> I guess Lizhi wanted to say that it does not provide a way to describe
> >>> all the "platform" devices that are exposed by this PCI device. Which
> >>> is of course the whole point of the work we are doing right now. But
> >>> all the BARs are correctly described by the LAN9662 PCI card.
> >>>
> >>> Clément
> >>
> >> I remain confused.
> >>
> >> [RFC 00/10] add support for fwnode in i2c mux system and sfp
> >> https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/YhQHqDJvahgriDZK@lunn.ch/t/
> >>
> >> references a PCIe driver:
> >> [2]
> >> https://github.com/clementleger/linux/blob/fwnode_support/drivers/mfd/lan966x_pci_mfd.c
> >>
> >> So there is a PCIe driver that works.
> >>
> >> However, the RFC patch series was proposing adding fwnode support to
> >> the driver. My first
> >> surface reading (just part of that one email, not the entire series or
> >> the replies yet),
> >> notes:
> >>
> >> ... However, when
> >> plugged in a PCIe slot (on a x86), there is no device-tree support
> >> and
> >> the peripherals that are present must be described in some other way.
> >>
> >> I am assuming that the peripherals are what you mentioned above as
> >> '"platform"
> >> devices'. This is where my current confusion lies. Are the "platform"
> >> devices accessed via the PCI bus or is there some other electrical
> >> connection
> >> between the host system and the PCIe card?
> >
> > Hi Frank,
> >
> > The platform devices exposed by this PCIe card are available via some
> > BAR using PCI memory mapped areas, so it's totally standard PCI stuff.
> >
> >>
> >> If the "platform" devices are accessed via the PCI bus, then I would
> >> expect them
> >> to be described by PCI configuration header registers. Are the PCI
> >> configuration
> >> registers to describe the "platform" devices not present?
> >
> > I'm not sure to understand what you mean here. PCI configuration headers
> > only provides some basic registers allowing to identify the PCI device
> > (vendor/product) and some memory areas that are exposed (BAR). They do
> > not provides the "list" of peripherals that are exposed by the devices,
> > only some BARs that can be mapped and that allows to access.
>
> Yes, "identify the PCI device (vendor/product) and some memory areas".
> The driver for the (vendor/product) 'knows' what peripherals are exposed
> by the device and where within the BAR to find the registers for each
> of the devices.
>
> A normal PCI driver would contain this information. If I understand the
> proposal of this patch series, of_pci_make_dev_node() adds a node to
> the devicetree, when invoked via a PCI quirk for certain specific
> vendor/product cards. This node must exist for the flattened device
> tree (FDT) overlay for the card to be loaded. The driver for the card
> will get the overlay FDT from the card and load it into the kernel.
> The driver will use the information that then exists in the devicetree
> describing the card, instead of using information from the PCI configuration
> headers from the card.

How would all the sub devices be defined by the PCI config space other
than a VID/PID implies *everything*. That's the same as the pre-DT
world where the ARM machine ID number (from RMK's registry) implied
everything. These days, we can have an entire SoC exposed behind a PCI
BAR which I think is pretty much Clement's usecase. Putting an SoC
behind a PCI BAR is no more discoverable than a "normal" SoC.

>
> The intent is to be able to re-use devicetree based drivers instead of
> having the driver be a native PCI driver.

Not instead of. There's the PCI driver for the FPGA or SoC bus with
multiple unrelated devices behind it. The PCI driver is just a bus
driver much like we have for various custom SoC bus drivers.

> This goes against historical Linux practice. The idea of taking a driver
> from another environment (eg Windows, HP Unix, Sun Unix, IBM Unix, etc)
> and adding a shim layer to translate between Linux and the other
> environment has been rejected. Ironically, in this case, the other
> environment is Linux (more specifically the Linux OF implementation).

I don't see how your example relates to this in any way whatsoever.
We're talking about different discovery mechanisms, not different
driver models/environments.

> Even thought the other environment is Linux, this is still adding a
> shim layer to translate between that other environment and the native
> Linux PCI environment for which the driver would normally be written.
>
> In other words, this is not acceptable. Normal alternatives would be
> something like
> (1) add the PCI awareness to the existing drivers,

The downstream devices don't have their own PCI config space. That
won't work. PCI drivers expect a device with PCI config space. Devices
to drivers are always 1:1, so we couldn't share the config space among
multiple drivers or something. For devices which are not discoverable
like these are, our choices are DT, ACPI or s/w nodes (aka
platform_data 2.0).

> (2) split the devicetree aware and PCI aware portions of the driver
> to common code that would be invoked from separate devicetree and PCI
> drivers,

That only makes sense for something that is a single driver. Not the
case here. For the FPGA, the devices are not known up front.

> (3) write entirely separate devicetree and PCI drivers, or

For the same reason as 1, that simply won't work.

> (4) some other creative solution.
>
> Am I mis-interpretting or misunderstanding anything crucial here?

Yes...

We now have 3 different use cases all needing the same thing. The
3rd[1] is the recent test infrastructure change to have test devices
added. They all have non-discoverable devices downstream of a PCI
device. We need a solution here.

Rob

[1] https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/20230120-simple-mfd-pci-v1-1-c46b3d6601ef@axis.com/

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2023-03-27 00:46    [W:2.005 / U:0.264 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site