lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2022]   [Jun]   [6]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: [RFC PATCH v4 2/7] mm/demotion: Expose per node memory tier to sysfs
On Mon, 6 Jun 2022 21:31:16 +0530
Aneesh Kumar K V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com> wrote:

> On 6/6/22 8:29 PM, Jonathan Cameron wrote:
> > On Fri, 3 Jun 2022 14:10:47 +0530
> > Aneesh Kumar K V <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com> wrote:
> >
> >> On 5/27/22 7:45 PM, Jonathan Cameron wrote:
> >>> On Fri, 27 May 2022 17:55:23 +0530
> >>> "Aneesh Kumar K.V" <aneesh.kumar@linux.ibm.com> wrote:
> >>>
> >>>> From: Jagdish Gediya <jvgediya@linux.ibm.com>
> >>>>
> >>>> Add support to read/write the memory tierindex for a NUMA node.
> >>>>
> >>>> /sys/devices/system/node/nodeN/memtier
> >>>>
> >>>> where N = node id
> >>>>
> >>>> When read, It list the memory tier that the node belongs to.
> >>>>
> >>>> When written, the kernel moves the node into the specified
> >>>> memory tier, the tier assignment of all other nodes are not
> >>>> affected.
> >>>>
> >>>> If the memory tier does not exist, writing to the above file
> >>>> create the tier and assign the NUMA node to that tier.
> >>> creates
> >>>
> >>> There was some discussion in v2 of Wei Xu's RFC that what matter
> >>> for creation is the rank, not the tier number.
> >>>
> >>> My suggestion is move to an explicit creation file such as
> >>> memtier/create_tier_from_rank
> >>> to which writing the rank gives results in a new tier
> >>> with the next device ID and requested rank.
> >>
> >> I think the below workflow is much simpler.
> >>
> >> :/sys/devices/system# cat memtier/memtier1/nodelist
> >> 1-3
> >> :/sys/devices/system# cat node/node1/memtier
> >> 1
> >> :/sys/devices/system# ls memtier/memtier*
> >> nodelist power rank subsystem uevent
> >> /sys/devices/system# ls memtier/
> >> default_rank max_tier memtier1 power uevent
> >> :/sys/devices/system# echo 2 > node/node1/memtier
> >> :/sys/devices/system#
> >>
> >> :/sys/devices/system# ls memtier/
> >> default_rank max_tier memtier1 memtier2 power uevent
> >> :/sys/devices/system# cat memtier/memtier1/nodelist
> >> 2-3
> >> :/sys/devices/system# cat memtier/memtier2/nodelist
> >> 1
> >> :/sys/devices/system#
> >>
> >> ie, to create a tier we just write the tier id/tier index to
> >> node/nodeN/memtier file. That will create a new memory tier if needed
> >> and add the node to that specific memory tier. Since for now we are
> >> having 1:1 mapping between tier index to rank value, we can derive the
> >> rank value from the memory tier index.
> >>
> >> For dynamic memory tier support, we can assign a rank value such that
> >> new memory tiers are always created such that it comes last in the
> >> demotion order.
> >
> > I'm not keen on having to pass through an intermediate state where
> > the rank may well be wrong, but I guess it's not that harmful even
> > if it feels wrong ;)
> >
>
> Any new memory tier added can be of lowest rank (rank - 0) and hence
> will appear as the highest memory tier in demotion order.

Depends on driver interaction - if new memory is CXL attached or
GPU attached, chances are the driver has an input on which tier
it is put in by default.

> User can then
> assign the right rank value to the memory tier? Also the actual demotion
> target paths are built during memory block online which in most case
> would happen after we properly verify that the device got assigned to
> the right memory tier with correct rank value?

Agreed, though that may change the model of how memory is brought online
somewhat.

>
> > Races are potentially a bit of a pain though depending on what we
> > expect the usage model to be.
> >
> > There are patterns (CXL regions for example) of guaranteeing the
> > 'right' device is created by doing something like
> >
> > cat create_tier > temp.txt
> > #(temp gets 2 for example on first call then
> > # next read of this file gets 3 etc)
> >
> > cat temp.txt > create_tier
> > # will fail if there hasn't been a read of the same value
> >
> > Assuming all software keeps to the model, then there are no
> > race conditions over creation. Otherwise we have two new
> > devices turn up very close to each other and userspace scripting
> > tries to create two new tiers - if it races they may end up in
> > the same tier when that wasn't the intent. Then code to set
> > the rank also races and we get two potentially very different
> > memories in a tier with a randomly selected rank.
> >
> > Fun and games... And a fine illustration why sysfs based 'device'
> > creation is tricky to get right (and lots of cases in the kernel
> > don't).
> >
>
> I would expect userspace to be careful and verify the memory tier and
> rank value before we online the memory blocks backed by the device. Even
> if we race, the result would be two device not intended to be part of
> the same memory tier appearing at the same tier. But then we won't be
> building demotion targets yet. So userspace could verify this, move the
> nodes out of the memory tier. Once it is verified, memory blocks can be
> onlined.

The race is there and not avoidable as far as I can see. Two processes A and B.

A checks for a spare tier number
B checks for a spare tier number
A tries to assign node 3 to new tier 2 (new tier created)
B tries to assign node 4 to new tier 2 (accidentally hits existing tier - as this
is the same method we'd use to put it in the existing tier we can't tell this
write was meant to create a new tier).
A writes rank 100 to tier 2
A checks rank for tier 2 and finds it is 100 as expected.
B write rank 200 to tier 2 (it could check if still default but even that is racy)
B checks rank for tier 2 rank and finds it is 200 as expected.
A onlines memory.
B onlines memory.

Both think they got what they wanted, but A definitely didn't.

One work around is the read / write approach and create_tier.

A reads create_tier - gets 2.
B reads create_tier - gets 3.
A writes 2 to create_tier as that's what it read.
B writes 3 to create_tier as that's what it read.

continue with created tiers. Obviously can exhaust tiers, but if this is
root only, could just create lots anyway so no worse off.

>
> Having said that can you outline the usage of
> memtier/create_tier_from_rank ?

There are corner cases to deal with...

A writes 100 to create_tier_from_rank.
A goes looking for matching tier - finds it: tier2
B writes 200 to create_tier_from_rank
B goes looking for matching tier - finds it: tier3

rest is fine as operating on different tiers.

Trickier is
A writes 100 to create_tier_from_rank - succeed.
B writes 100 to create_tier_from_rank - Could fail, or could just eat it?

Logically this is same as separate create_tier and then a write
of rank, but in one operation, but then you need to search
for the right one. As such, perhaps a create_tier
that does the read/write pair as above is the best solution.

Jonathan


>
> -aneesh

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2022-06-06 18:19    [W:0.126 / U:0.124 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site