lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2021]   [Aug]   [29]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
Patch in this message
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: [PATCH v8 08/14] iio: afe: rescale: reduce risk of integer overflow
On Thu, Aug 26, 2021 at 11:13:38AM +0200, Peter Rosin wrote:
> On 2021-08-20 21:17, Liam Beguin wrote:
> > From: Liam Beguin <lvb@xiphos.com>
> >
> > Reduce the risk of integer overflow by doing the scale calculation on
> > a 64-bit integer. Since the rescaling is only performed on *val, reuse
> > the IIO_VAL_FRACTIONAL_LOG2 case.
>
> While this patch certainly helps with overflow problems, it also
> potentially kills precision in some cases where there currently are
> no overflow issues.
>
> E.g. this patch transforms 5/32768 scaled by 3/10000 from the exact
>
> 15 / 327680000 (0.0000000457763671875)
>
> to the heavily truncated plain old sorry "zero".
>
> Sure, 9/14 improves the situation, but patch 9/14 simply cannot
> make this example any better than returning 2 significant digits
> since the value is so small.

The 100 ppm check introduced in 09/14 is really objective and might not
be the best choice. Changing it to

- if (abs(rem) > 10000000 && abs(div64_s64(*val, tmp)) < 100) {
+ if (abs(rem)) {

Helps with the precision issues you brought up here, and in 09/14.
I was originally trying to keep the original scale as much as possible,
I'll continue the rest of the discussion on the 09/14 thread we already
have.

>
> Side note, there is also the same type of risk of overflow for
> IIO_VAL_INT. Why does that case not get the same treatment as
> IIO_VAL_FRACTIONAL?
>

Being totally honest, I noticed we have the same issue with IIO_VAL_INT,
but since I didn't run into the issue on my setup I left it out to focus
on getting the rest cleaned up.

I guess it couldn't hurt to fix that too while we're at it.
I'll work on it!

> But again, I see no elegant solution. The best I can think of is the
> inelegant solution to provide extra info on the input range, the
> exact desired scaling method, the desired output type, some mix of
> all of the above or something else that helps determining the
> appropriate scaling method w/o looking at the individual number.

I don't really like having to add a range parameter.
If changing the scale type dynamically isn't an issue, I think we can
get away with not adding a parameter.
If it is an issue, we might have to look into it...

Thanks,
Liam

>
> Cheers,
> Peter
>
> > Signed-off-by: Liam Beguin <lvb@xiphos.com>
> > ---
> > drivers/iio/afe/iio-rescale.c | 5 +----
> > 1 file changed, 1 insertion(+), 4 deletions(-)
> >
> > diff --git a/drivers/iio/afe/iio-rescale.c b/drivers/iio/afe/iio-rescale.c
> > index 809e966f7058..c408c4057c08 100644
> > --- a/drivers/iio/afe/iio-rescale.c
> > +++ b/drivers/iio/afe/iio-rescale.c
> > @@ -27,16 +27,13 @@ int rescale_process_scale(struct rescale *rescale, int scale_type,
> > u32 neg;
> >
> > switch (scale_type) {
> > - case IIO_VAL_FRACTIONAL:
> > - *val *= rescale->numerator;
> > - *val2 *= rescale->denominator;
> > - return scale_type;
> > case IIO_VAL_INT:
> > *val *= rescale->numerator;
> > if (rescale->denominator == 1)
> > return scale_type;
> > *val2 = rescale->denominator;
> > return IIO_VAL_FRACTIONAL;
> > + case IIO_VAL_FRACTIONAL:
> > case IIO_VAL_FRACTIONAL_LOG2:
> > tmp = (s64)*val * 1000000000LL;
> > tmp = div_s64(tmp, rescale->denominator);
> >
>

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2021-08-29 06:02    [W:2.466 / U:0.096 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site