lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2021]   [Dec]   [16]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
From
SubjectRe: [PATCH v5 1/2] wilc1000: Add reset/enable GPIO support to SPI driver
Date
On 15.12.2021 16:59, David Mosberger-Tang wrote:
> EXTERNAL EMAIL: Do not click links or open attachments unless you know the content is safe
>
> On Wed, 2021-12-15 at 06:41 +0000, Claudiu.Beznea@microchip.com wrote:
>> On 15.12.2021 05:05, David Mosberger-Tang wrote:
>>>
>> +static int wilc_parse_gpios(struct wilc *wilc)
>>> +{
>>> + struct spi_device *spi = to_spi_device(wilc->dev);
>>> + struct wilc_spi *spi_priv = wilc->bus_data;
>>> + struct wilc_gpios *gpios = &spi_priv->gpios;
>>> +
>>> + /* get ENABLE pin and deassert it (if it is defined): */
>>> + gpios->enable = devm_gpiod_get_optional(&spi->dev,
>>> + "enable", GPIOD_OUT_LOW);
>>> + /* get RESET pin and assert it (if it is defined): */
>>> + if (gpios->enable) {
>>> + /* if enable pin exists, reset must exist as well */
>>> + gpios->reset = devm_gpiod_get(&spi->dev,
>>> + "reset", GPIOD_OUT_HIGH);
>>
>> As far as I can tell form gpiolib code the difference b/w GPIOD_OUT_HIGH
>> and GPIOD_OUT_LOW in gpiolib is related to the initial value for the GPIO.
>
> Yes.
>
>> Did you used GPIOD_OUT_HIGH for reset to have the chip out of reset at this
>> point?
>
> No, ~RESET is an active-low signal. GPIOD_OUT_LOW should really be
> called GPIOD_OUT_DEASSERTED or something like that. The code ensures
> that the chip is in RESET and ~ENABLEd after parsing the GPIOs.
>
>>> + if (IS_ERR(gpios->reset)) {
>>> + dev_err(&spi->dev, "missing reset gpio.\n");
>>> + return PTR_ERR(gpios->reset);
>>> + }
>>> + } else {
>>> + gpios->reset = devm_gpiod_get_optional(&spi->dev,
>>> + "reset", GPIOD_OUT_HIGH);
>>> + }
>>> + return 0;
>>> +}
>>> +
>>> +static void wilc_wlan_power(struct wilc *wilc, bool on)
>>> +{
>>> + struct wilc_spi *spi_priv = wilc->bus_data;
>>> + struct wilc_gpios *gpios = &spi_priv->gpios;
>>> +
>>> + if (on) {
>>> + gpiod_set_value(gpios->enable, 1); /* assert ENABLE */
>>> + mdelay(5);
>>> + gpiod_set_value(gpios->reset, 0); /* deassert RESET */
>>
>> From what I can tell from gpiolib code, requesting the pin from device tree
>> with:
>>
>> + reset-gpios = <&pioA 6 GPIO_ACTIVE_LOW>;
>>
>> makes the value written with gpiod_set_value() to be negated, thus the 0
>> written here is translated to a 1 on the pin. Is there a reason you did it
>> like this?
>
> Yes, of course. RESET is an active-low signal, as defined in the
> datasheet.

Right, I missed that.

>
>> Would it have been simpler to have both pins requested with
>> GPIO_ACTIVE_HIGH and here to do gpiod_set_value(gpio, 1) for both of the
>> pin. In this way, at the first read of the code one one would have been
>> telling that it does what datasheet specifies: for power on toggle enable
>> and reset gpios from 0 to 1 with a delay in between.
>
> I think you're confusing 0 and 1 with low-voltage and high-voltage. 0
> means de-assert the signal, 1 means assert the signal. Whether that
> translates to a low voltage or a high voltage depends on whether the
> signal a active-low or active-high.
>
>>
>>
>>> + } else {
>>> + gpiod_set_value(gpios->reset, 1); /* assert RESET */
>>> + gpiod_set_value(gpios->enable, 0); /* deassert ENABLE */
>>
>> I don't usually see comments near the code line in kernel. Maybe move them
>> before the actual code line or remove them at all as the code is impler enough?
>
> You're kidding, right?
>
> --david
>

\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2021-12-16 08:09    [W:0.124 / U:0.196 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site