lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2015]   [Jul]   [15]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
/
Date
From
SubjectRe: [PATCH 0/7] Add rcu_sync infrastructure to avoid _expedited() in percpu-rwsem
On Wed, Jul 15, 2015 at 09:36:01PM +0200, Oleg Nesterov wrote:
> On 07/15, Paul E. McKenney wrote:
> >
> > On Sun, Jul 12, 2015 at 01:35:35AM +0200, Oleg Nesterov wrote:
> >
> > > Let's start with the simple test-case,
> > >
> > > #!/bin/bash
> > >
> > > perf probe -x /lib/libc.so.6 syscall
> > >
> > > for i in {1..1000}; do
> > > echo 1 >| /sys/kernel/debug/tracing/events/probe_libc/syscall/enable
> > > echo 0 >| /sys/kernel/debug/tracing/events/probe_libc/syscall/enable
> > > done
> > >
> > > It needs ~ 13.5 seconds (2 CPUs, KVM). If we simply replace
> > > synchronize_sched_expedited() with synchronize_sched() it takes
> > > ~ 67.5 seconds. This is not good.
> >
> > Yep, even if you avoided the write-release grace period, you would
> > still be looking at something like 40 seconds, which is 3x. Some
> > might consider that to be a performance regression. ;-)
>
> Yes ;)
>
> > > And just in case, I also measured
> > >
> > > for (i = 0; i < 1000000; ++i) {
> > > percpu_down_write(&dup_mmap_sem);
> > > percpu_up_write(&dup_mmap_sem);
> > > }
> > >
> > > and it runs more than 1.5 times faster (to remind, only 2 CPUs),
> > > but this is not that interesting, I agree.
> >
> > Your trick avoiding the grace periods during a writer-to-writer handoff
> > are cute, and they are helping a lot here.
>
> Yes. And even the fact that a single writer doesn't need to sleep in
> percpu_up_write()->synchronize_sched() looks good imo.
>
> Yes, yes, we can remove it if we penalize the readers, but I'd like to
> avoid this.
>
> > Concurrent readers would
> > have a tough time of it with this workload, though. They would all
> > be serialized.
>
> Sure. in this case it is not better than the normal rw_semaphore. Worse
> actually.
>
> > > And note that the actual change in percpu-rwsem is really simple,
> > > and imo it even makes the code simpler. (the last patch is off-
> > > topic cleanup).
> > >
> > > So the only complication is rcu_sync itself. But, rightly or not (I
> > > am obviously biased), I believe this new rcu infrastructure is natural
> > > and useful, and I think it can have more users too.
> >
> > I don't have an objection to it, even in its current form (I did
> > review it long ago), but it does need to have a user!
>
> Do you mean you need another user except percpu_rw_semaphore? I do
> not see any right now...

Not asking for more than one use, but it does need a use. I believe
that percpu_rw_semaphore suffices.

> Let me remind about sb_writers again. It actually has 3 rw_sem's
> and I am trying to turn then into percpu_rw_semaphore's.
>
> In this case freeze_super() will need 6 synchronize_sched_expedited().
> This just looks ugly. But if we have rcu_sync primitives, all 3 sem's
> in struct super_block can share the same "struct rcu_sync", and
> freeze_super() will need only once synchronize_sched().

Makes sense.

> > > And. We can do more improvements in rcu_sync and percpu-rwsem, and
> > > I don't only mean other optimizations from Peter. In particular, we
> > > can extract the "wait for gp pass" from rcu_sync_enter() into another
> > > helper, we can teach percpu_down_write() to allow multiple writers,
> > > and more.
> >
> > As in a percpu_down_write() that allows up to (say) five concurrent
> > write-holders?
>
> Yes. Because this is what uprobes (and probably cgroups) actually needs.
> It does not need the global lock. Just it needs to exclude the "readers"
> (dup_mmap) globally.
>
> And in fact the very first version I sent worked this way. Then I removed
> this because a) this was a bit "unusual" for reviewers ;) and b) because
> I raced with another commit which has already added the initial (and
> sub-optimal) version of percpu_rw_semaphore.

;-)

Thanx, Paul



\
 
 \ /
  Last update: 2015-07-16 00:21    [W:0.090 / U:0.176 seconds]
©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site