lkml.org 
[lkml]   [2012]   [Dec]   [12]   [last100]   RSS Feed
Views: [wrap][no wrap]   [headers]  [forward] 
 
Messages in this thread
    /
    Date
    From
    SubjectRe: Fwd: Safely remove option shows with Micro SD Card connected to Linux through an Android phone
    On Wed, 12 Dec 2012, Robert Hancock wrote:

    > On 12/11/2012 02:37 PM, Alan Stern wrote:
    > > On Tue, 11 Dec 2012, prasannatsmkumar wrote:
    > >
    > >> Hi All,
    > >>
    > >> I connected an Android phone using USB cable to my machine running
    > >> Linux (Linux 3.0, 3.2, 3.5). Mounted the SD card in phone in system
    > >> (phone is just a pass through I guess). When I choose "Safely Remove"
    > >> option in nautilus file manager (gnome's default file manager) I got
    > >> an error saying
    > >>
    > >> "Error detaching: helper exited with exit code 1: Detaching device /dev/sdb
    > >> USB device: /sys/devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:1d.7/usb1/1-5)
    > >> SYNCHRONIZE CACHE: OK
    > >> STOP UNIT: FAILED: No such file or directory"
    > >
    > > STOP UNIT means spin down the disk or eject the disc. Since your phone
    > > doesn't have a disk drive or an optical disc, no wonder this step
    > > failed.
    >
    > The reason it's likely doing a STOP UNIT on USB storage devices is that
    > this is preferable for at least USB-connected HDs (at least where the
    > USB to SATA, etc. converter bothers to implement the translation). For
    > many drives, it's better for the disk's lifespan to power it down
    > normally (as it would be if it was in a machine that was being shut
    > down) so it can unload its heads in a controlled fashion, rather than
    > just cutting the power on the running disk and causing an emergency head
    > retract.
    >
    > Some types of devices may not support that command or may not do
    > anything useful with it, but "No such file or directory" seems a strange
    > error to run into.

    That's the error code returned by the USB stack when a request is
    cancelled synchronously. But it is intended for internal kernel use
    only; it should not appear at the userspace level. Without knowing the
    details of what the program did, it's hard to tell how that code got
    there.

    Alan Stern



    \
     
     \ /
      Last update: 2012-12-12 17:21    [W:6.431 / U:1.048 seconds]
    ©2003-2020 Jasper Spaans|hosted at Digital Ocean and TransIP|Read the blog|Advertise on this site